Planner Design

How to Curate the Perfect List of Holidays for Your Planner Design

How to Curate the Perfect List of Holidays for Your Planner Design

After you’ve designed your planner’s calendar pages, it’s time to think about the content you want to include in them: religious and federal holidays, observances, seasons, and clock changes. If you have been doing this for a while, you probably have a set list you use every year. And if you’re just diving into your first planner, it can be tough to decide what to include. For the old pros, it’s time to take a look at your list of holidays for anything that might be missing or incorrect. For instance, have you considered adding Indigenous Peoples’ Day?

Regardless of whether or not you are new to the planner world it’s good practice to reevaluate your list of holidays each year. Today I’ll walk you through my philosophy on which holidays to include in your planner designs and how to curate your very own list.

Converting Fonts to Outlines in Your Print Files

Converting Fonts to Outlines in Your Print Files

When sending files to a commercial printer, they often request that you convert fonts to outlines first. This is so they can open your files without needing to load the proper fonts onto their system. It not only simplifies their workflow, but streamlines the file transfer process for everyone involved.

There are various ways to create outlines directly in your InDesign files, but I don’t recommend messing with your native files for this. Inevitably you’ll have to make changes to that file, and if you accidentally choose “save” rather than “save as,” your latest editable version could be lost forever. #designersworstnightmare

Instead, I recommend converting fonts to outlines in your PDF files. This is a much safer option, not to mention super simple and fast. Just follow the steps below.

The Anatomy of a Copyright Page

The Anatomy of a Copyright Page

You’ve poured your heart and soul into making the best planner possible. Now you need to protect your work. Including a copyright page is vital to protecting it against unauthorized use, and giving yourself credit for your creation.

While protecting your work is important, it’s not necessary to put a copyright line on each page of your planner—we’ve seen a few instances where it was worked into the footer of every page throughout the design. Putting this information on just one page is sufficient.

Let’s dive into the details! Feel free to copy and paste our examples into your own planner design files.

Weekly vs. Daily: Which Planner is the Better Seller?

Weekly vs. Daily: Which Planner is the Better Seller?

“Should I design a weekly planner or a daily? Which planner is the better seller?”

I’m going to guess that you’ve asked yourself these questions before.

I get this question a lot—and it’s wise to want to design what sells. But planners are such a personal product that the answer is not always easy to determine.